My Faults My Own

…beleaguered by the same

negation and despair,

show an affirming flame.

IN WHICH Ross Rheingans-Yoo, a sometimes-poet and erstwhile student of Computer Science and Math, oc­cas­ion­al­ly writes on things of int­erest.

Reading Feed (last update: January 21)

A collection of things that I was happy I read. Views expressed by linked authors are chosen because I think they're interesting, not because I think they're correct, unless indicated otherwise.


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Blog: (finish later) | 3 Thought Experiments: An Exercise in Ponens and Tollens

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Dear Canada: Don’t Ban Paid Blood Plasma Donation

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Do markets underprovide genetic insurance?

Interview: Conversations with Tyler | Ross Douthat on Narrative and Religion

Blog: Tyler Cowen @ Bloomberg View | Rule of Law Can't Ignore Human Costs — Weakly argued, I think, though Tyler does well to raise important points.


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Blog: Marginal Revolution | The value of media attention for mass killers — "But nobody wants it! Everybody hates it!" / "Oh. Well, then stop."


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Blog: Less Wrong | Announcement: AI alignment prize winners and next round


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Blog: Overcoming Bias | Social

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January 2 Links: "2015"

First, I apologize (again!) to anyone who actually noticed that I'd gone on something like a month-long hiatus for most of December -- I had a lot of finals, and let this thing fall by the wayside. But welcome back, because here we go again, in a new year, with new tweaks in the linkwrap formatting. (Like them? Hate them? I'm still tinkering, so do feel free to comment!)

First, you should totally check out Scott Alexander's 12/14 linkwrap at Slate Star Codex; it's got:

  • Werewolves (and the President of Argentina)
  • Nuclear rocket engines
  • Gender bias in maritime disasters ("Women and children first!" a myth?)
  • A new cure for Alzheimers
  • ...and so much more.

Do it!

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Okay, okay, real links from me. The Economist explains why so many Koreans are named 'Kim'.

Kim:21.6%, Lee:14.8%, Park:8.5%, Choi:4.7%, Jung:4.4%
via Wikipedia, prevalence of the names Kim, Lee, Park, Choi, and Jung (combined with common

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