My Faults My Own

…willing to sacrifice something we don't have

for something we won't have, so somebody will someday.

IN WHICH Ross Rheingans-Yoo, a sometimes-poet and erstwhile student of Computer Science and Math, oc­cas­ion­al­ly writes on things of int­erest.

Reading Feed (last update: November 24)

A collection of things that I was glad I read. Views expressed by linked authors are chosen because I think they're interesting, not because I think they're correct, unless indicated otherwise.


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Blog: Marginal Revolution | The Republican Club — why is this painting interesting? — Tyler plays art critic; see also The Democratic Club, by the same artist.

Blog: Marginal Revolution | A Time to Fast — on calorie reduction strategies.


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Blog: Marginal Revolution | The best results on assortative mating and inequality I have seen — "Individuals face a large degree of uncertainty about their permanent wages early in their careers. If they marry early, as most individuals in the late 1960s did, this uncertainty leads to weak marital sorting along permanent wage. But when marriage is delayed, as in the late 1980s, the sorting

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August 29: Bucket o' Links

I'm stealing a good idea from a friend, who stole it from a friend. It goes like this: Fridays, I'll write up a post that consists of seven cool (or interesting, or important...) things I found elsewhere on the internet (or in bookspace, or whatever). That's it.

If I can manage that, it sets a floor of one post per week, which is good, and hopefully shames me into writing something else in-between to avoid the shame of posting two consecutive Fridays, which is better. Or it'll fail and I'll look foolish. Who knows? Presenting...Friday Bucket o' Links (which also goes by the name "Seven Quick Takes" elsewhere)

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In what I promise is the last Excellent Sheep-related thing I'll link to this month, here's an excellent two-sided discussion between Harry Lewis and Bill Deresiewicz on excellence, souls, sheep, and related things in the Chronicle of Higher Education. Both sides make excellent points, though perhaps it's no surprise which I think comes out on top. Excerpt from Lewis:

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