My Faults My Own

…beleaguered by the same

negation and despair,

show an affirming flame.

IN WHICH Ross Rheingans-Yoo, a sometimes-poet and erstwhile student of Computer Science and Math, oc­cas­ion­al­ly writes on things of int­erest.

Reading Feed (last update: April 23)

A collection of things that I was happy I read. Views expressed by linked authors are chosen because I think they're interesting, not because I think they're correct, unless indicated otherwise.


(23)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Superstars in the NBA playoffs, and the heightening of income inequality — "As more and more of contemporary business becomes regularized and measured and motivated and based on well-ordered cooperating teams, might the same be true for the transcendent superstars of that world as well? In essence, we’re always in the business 'playoffs' these days, at least in Manhattan and Silicon Valley..."


(22)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | The symphony orchestra and the Industrial Revolution — "I heard Mozart’s 39th symphony in concert last night, and it occurred to me (once again) that I also was witnessing one of mankind’s greatest technological achievements. Think

READ MORE

Notes: Building a Better Web Browser

These are my cursory notes from a talk given by James Mickens of Microsoft Research, in March 2015, titled "Building a Better Web Browser".

Notes legibility estimate: MEDIUM


The State of Progress

Chrome, Opera isolate the renderer in separate processes -- this allows tabs to crash on their own. ...but the issue is that the browswer is still a monolithic kernel.

Servo -- extra threading! ...but still monolithic.

The problem: Browser developers take the monolithic design as a given, and tinker around the edges.

The Problem

What is a browser trying to do? Provide services for origins -- render, computation, i/o + messaging

  • It provides origin = <protocol, host, port>

Render: HTML CSS MathML Aria WebGL video canvas images

IO: XHR DOM IndexedDB Cookies FileReader BrowserCache AppCache

Currently: providing services for origins, but they're high-level and complex. You wouldn't ask your operating system to implement Emacs in the kernel.

READ MORE

http://dev/null

content warning: rampant cynicism, tongue-in-cheek metaphor


Today, I was going through my morning newspaper feedreader[1], saw a few links I liked, socked some away for Friday's linkwrap, dropped some others in my blog's reading feed, on the off-chance that I -- or someone else trawling the archives of Faults -- would want to revisit them later. Another one was an annoying article on Bloomberg about how the FCC's Title II reclassification of Internet Service Providers will raise rates by $X and thus price Internet access out of the reach of Y million households.

And I closed it, and didn't show it to anyone, and hoped that that would mean that fewer people would look at it. Yes, I could have pointed at it for the purposes of dissent, but I've got a post about vaccines to write, and blogging confrontationally makes me sad, so I decided that it was

READ MORE

January 9 Links: Futures and Pasts of Things

1

The Upshot, when they're not putting out awesome data features, apparently publishes things like Obama's Community-College Plan: A Reading List, which is a useful read on (1) what is actually being proposed (2) how it compares to other similar proposals and programs (3) why any of this matters.

The odds of a Republican Congress passing an Obama proposal on any issue aren't very high... [But i]f nothing else, the Obama proposal seems likely to increase the profile of the universal-college movement. That movement echoes the universal-high-school movement of the early 20th century, as I mentioned in an article Thursday. (...)

And a short bit of opinion on the necessity of "universal college":

Yet we never stop to ask why 13 years of universal education has become the magic number -- and why it should permanently be so, given how much more complex our society and economy have become in

READ MORE

November 28 Bucket o' Links: "(Un)reality" Edition

Welp, some weeks I just sit on the linkwrap for an extra five days. Plan is still to throw another one up this Friday, by which I mean, tomorrow... urp.

Blah blah blah blah Reading Feed blah.

1

Sometimes, when we're interacting with people on the internet, we forget that, on the other end of a digital pipeline, there's an actual human being.

...and so, sometimes the right way to deal with internet trolls is by letting their mothers know what they're up to:

Alanah Pearce, student and sometime-game-reviewer, is quoted in The Guardian:

"A while ago, I realised that a lot of the people who send disgusting or overly sexual comments to me over the internet aren't adult males... It

READ MORE
1 / 1