My Faults My Own

One's ponens is another's tollens.

IN WHICH Ross Rheingans-Yoo, a sometimes-poet and erstwhile student of Computer Science and Math, oc­cas­ion­al­ly writes on things of int­erest.

Reading Feed (last update: July 9)

A collection of things that I was happy I read. Views expressed by linked authors are chosen because I think they're interesting, not because I think they're correct, unless indicated otherwise.


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Blog: Marginal Revolution | China green energy projection of the day — "China’s energy companies will make up nearly half of the new coal generation expected to go online in the next decade... Keep this all in mind the next time you hear someone tout China as the new leader of the global green energy movement."


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Blog: Marginal Revolution | Cheer you up true story from Maine — "But in Maine, servers actively campaigned to overturn the results of a November referendum raising servers’ hourly wages from $3.75 in 2016 to $12 by 2024, saying it would cause customers to tip less and actually reduce their take-home

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Cultivated Publicy

Publicy is a term coined (or at least signal-boosted to me) by Jeff Kaufman in a series of posts (beginning with JeffTK | Giving Up on Privacy, JeffTK | Publicy and Notification, and JeffTK | A Right to Publicy) that I think is pretty great, because it's intuition-bending in a way that's reflective of the way the digital world is shaping up to be different from the physical one. (See also: Wiki | Sousveillance.)

Tyler Cowen (of MR) recently pointed to an article by the NYT about an interesting non-privacy which seems somehow related (NYT | Ratings Now Cut Both Ways, so Don't Sass Your Uber Driver):

"Highly specific pools of reputation information will become more useful in aggregate," said Mr. Fertik, co-author with David C. Thompson of "The Reputation Economy," a guide to optimizing digital footprints. "If you're a really good Uber passenger, that may be useful information for Amtrak or American Airlines. But

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