My Faults My Own

…willing to sacrifice something we don't have

for something we won't have, so somebody will someday.

IN WHICH Ross Rheingans-Yoo, a sometimes-poet and erstwhile student of Computer Science and Math, oc­cas­ion­al­ly writes on things of int­erest.

Reading Feed (last update: November 24)

A collection of things that I was glad I read. Views expressed by linked authors are chosen because I think they're interesting, not because I think they're correct, unless indicated otherwise.


(23)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | The Republican Club — why is this painting interesting? — Tyler plays art critic; see also The Democratic Club, by the same artist.

Blog: Marginal Revolution | A Time to Fast — on calorie reduction strategies.


(22)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | The best results on assortative mating and inequality I have seen — "Individuals face a large degree of uncertainty about their permanent wages early in their careers. If they marry early, as most individuals in the late 1960s did, this uncertainty leads to weak marital sorting along permanent wage. But when marriage is delayed, as in the late 1980s, the sorting

READ MORE

Today's Quote: Fallibility

Today's quote comes from a talk about programming languages:

"If you're ever writing code to loop over the indices of an array, just assume there's a bug in it somewhere."

(In particular, we were discussing pitfalls of imperative languages, but that's not at all important to what I'm trying to talk about, so ignore this sentence if you didn't understand it.)

Okay, so it's not quite true; I've reached the point in my programming career where, upon needing to write array-indexing code, I am still forced to stop, ask myself what I want to do, and then tell the computer to do it -- but at least I usually get it right that first time. Even so, there are certainly other areas of my life where I could benefit by applying similar logic:

  • If you're ever planning to be on time to a class/meeting/event, just assume that you're going to be ten minutes late.
  • If you're ever planning your time around the deadline for an assignment, just assume
READ MORE
1 / 1