My Faults My Own

…willing to sacrifice something we don't have

for something we won't have, so somebody will someday.

IN WHICH Ross Rheingans-Yoo, a sometimes-poet and erstwhile student of Computer Science and Math, oc­cas­ion­al­ly writes on things of int­erest.

Reading Feed (last update: May 26)

A collection of things that I was happy I read. Views expressed by linked authors are chosen because I think they're interesting, not because I think they're correct, unless indicated otherwise.


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Blog: Ben.Kuhn | Unintended consequences and GDPR (but not the way you think)


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Blog: Marginal Revolution | Gonder, Ethiopia

Blog: The Unit of Caring | How often should you actually be honest about the fact it’s the just and humane policy? — "But on the other hand - I think sometimes it actually holds us back to be lying. It is not true that ADHD meds help everyone with ADHD and are useless to anyone who doesn’t have ADHD. There are lots of people with ADHD for whom meds are useless, either because they got unlucky brain wiring and the meds

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Today's Quote: Fallibility

Today's quote comes from a talk about programming languages:

"If you're ever writing code to loop over the indices of an array, just assume there's a bug in it somewhere."

(In particular, we were discussing pitfalls of imperative languages, but that's not at all important to what I'm trying to talk about, so ignore this sentence if you didn't understand it.)

Okay, so it's not quite true; I've reached the point in my programming career where, upon needing to write array-indexing code, I am still forced to stop, ask myself what I want to do, and then tell the computer to do it -- but at least I usually get it right that first time. Even so, there are certainly other areas of my life where I could benefit by applying similar logic:

  • If you're ever planning to be on time to a class/meeting/event, just assume that you're
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