My Faults My Own

…willing to sacrifice something we don't have

for something we won't have, so somebody will someday.

Reading Feed (May 2019)


(31)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Might Facebook boost wages?

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Alec Stapp on GDPR


(30)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | The Tremendous Value of Increases in Life Expectancy

Blog: Marginal Revolution | The real losers from the U.S.-China trade war

Blog: The Grumpy Economist | An Apocalyptic View of Central Banks — "You may or may not think that carbon emissions are the 'biggest threat facing the planet.' Personally, while not denying carbon, I think war, pandemic, non-carbon-related environmental collapse and general social and government breakdown, are (even?) bigger threats. But if carbon is, in fact, our greatest threat, what is a central bank supposed to do about it?"


(29)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | The Marginal Revolutionaries: How Austrian Economists Fought the War of Ideas


(28)

Blog: Compass Rose | A drowning child is hard to find

Blog: Marginal Revolution | The JPE is going monthly in 2020


(27)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Bloat Does Not Explain the Rising Cost of Education


(26)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Viral Markets in Everything

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Bias against indigenous Americans?

Blog: Overcoming Bias | Chiang’s Exhalation


(25)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Why Are the Prices So D*MN High?


(23)

Blog: Market Design | Vic Fuchs on the problems of employment-based health insurance, in JAMA

Blog: Marginal Revolution | America’s Cities Are Unlivable. Blame Wealthy Liberals


(22)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | My Conversation with Ezekiel Emanuel

Blog: Marginal Revolution | One of the Greatest Environmental Crimes of the 20th Century


(21)

Blog: Don't Worry About the Vase | More Notes on Simple Rules

Self: My Faults My Own | Everybody knows

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Women’s liberation as a financial innovation

Blog: The Grumpy Economist | Clemens on minimum wage


(20)

Blog: Making Magic | Modern Sensibilities


(19)

Blog: Don't Worry About the Vase | Simple Rules of Law


(18)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | The internet gang deconversion culture that is Brazil


(17)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | What is the optimal tax rate on restaurants?


(16)

Blog: GiveWell | GiveWell’s plans for 2019

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Don’t relax about nuclear war


(15)

Blog: Market Design | Finding out what employers value in a candidate, without deception, by Kessler, Low and Sullivan

Blog: Marginal Revolution | The company that is Amazon

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Identity Economics is Bad Economics

Blog: GiveWell | Review of GiveWell’s work in 2018


(14)

Blog: World Optimization | Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco by Bryan Burrough My rating: 5 of 5 stars It was a...

Blog: Slate Star Codex | Age Gaps And Birth Order Effects

Blog: Overcoming Bias | Who Likes Simple Rules?

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Who loses most from the U.S.-China trade war?

Blog: The Grumpy Economist | Almost sane housing supply — "This is almost a remarkable outbreak of sanity. In a divided government, one can keep touting slogans. But when one party takes over, apparently permanently, they do have to actually govern, and eventually some reality must sink in..."


(13)

Blog: Making Magic | Odds & Ends: War of the Spark

Blog: Thing of Things | If You Believe In Short AI Timelines And A Positive Outcome You Should Consider Donating A Kidney

Interview: 80,000 Hours Podcast | Rob Wiblin on human nature, new technology, and living a happy, healthy & ethical life

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Do Pimples Pay? Acne, Human Capital, and the Labor Market


(12)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Nick Clegg on breaking up Facebook

Blog: Market Design | A (first) liver-kidney exchange


(11)

Blog: Market Design | How are American transplant centers regulated? How does this influence treatment decisions?


(10)

Blog: Don't Worry About the Vase | Tales From the American Medical System


(9)

Blog: Slate Star Codex | Is There A Case For Skepticism Of Psychedelic Therapy?

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Thursday assorted links

Blog: Market Design | Shrouded prices for blood tests in the U.S.

Blog: Schneier on Security | Amazon Is Losing the War on Fraudulent Sellers

Blog: Palladium | What Botswana Can Teach Us About Political Stability — "The world, including its functional governments, is a lot more dynastic than we like to admit, and dynasties work a lot better at securing institutional continuity and good government than we like to think. As we look into what’s actually working about the American order, and how it could work better, we should pay close attention to cases where dynasties like the Khamas are a significant driving force of success. We would do well to become more comfortable with their role."


(8)

Blog: What's New | The alternative hypothesis for unitary matrices


(7)

Blog: Slate Star Codex | 5-HTTLPR: A Pointed Review

Blog: Compass Rose | Towards optimal play as Villager in a mixed game

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Do minimum wage hikes get rid of bad restaurants?

Blog: The Grumpy Economist | Ip on carbon tax — "Either you have visible economic damage (carbon tax) of $1,000 per ton or invisible economic damage of $10,000 per ton. Prices are better than restrictions because you can see where you're wasting $10,000 per ton, which money could reduce 9 times as much carbon properly deployed."


(6)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Monday assorted links

Blog: Compass Rose | Blame games

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Intelligence predicts cooperativeness better than conscientiousness does


(5)

Blog: Overcoming Bias | Freedom Isn’t Free

Blog: Compass Rose | Should Effective Altruism be at war with North Korea?

Blog: The Grumpy Economist | Smith, MMT, and science in economics — "From the summaries I have read, some of the central propositions of MMT draw a false conclusion from two sensible premises. 1) Countries that print their own currencies do not have to default on excessive debts. They can always print money to pay off debts. True. 2) Inflation in the end can and must be controlled by raising taxes or cutting spending, sufficiently to soak up such printed (non-interest-bearing) money. True. The latter proposition is the heart of the fiscal theory of the price level, so I would have an especially tough time objecting..."


(4)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Which countries are best for creating and encouraging women chess players?


(3)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Dept. of Uh-Oh, college and mobility edition

Blog: Schneier on Security | Cybersecurity for the Public Interest


(2)

Blog: Overcoming Bias | Liability Insurance For All

Blog: Marginal Revolution | Why Twitter Isn’t Good for Coups


(1)

Blog: A Fine Theorem | The Price of Everything, The Value of the Economy: A Clark Medal for Emi Nakamura