Icosian Reflections

…a tendency to systematize and a keen sense

that we live in a broken world.

IN  WHICH Ross Rheingans-Yoo—a sometime economist, trader, artist, expat, poet, EA, and programmer—writes on things of int­erest.

Reading Feed (last update: August 6)

A collection of things that I was glad I read. Views expressed by linked authors are chosen because I think they’re interesting, not because I think they’re correct, unless indicated otherwise.


(5)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | PredictIt seems to be closing?


(4)

Blog: Marginal Revolution | How many times are we going to make this kind of mistake? — I am old enough to remember the claims that we had a strategic national stockpile of poxvirus vaccines large enough to vaccinate every American. Now: "The shortage of vaccines to combat a fast-growing monkeypox outbreak was caused in part because the Department of Health and Human Services failed early on to ask that bulk stocks of the vaccine it already owned be bottled for distribution, according to multiple administration officials familiar with the matter."

READ MORE

January 2 Links: "2015"

First, I apologize (again!) to anyone who actually noticed that I'd gone on something like a month-long hiatus for most of December -- I had a lot of finals, and let this thing fall by the wayside. But welcome back, because here we go again, in a new year, with new tweaks in the linkwrap formatting. (Like them? Hate them? I'm still tinkering, so do feel free to comment!)

First, you should totally check out Scott Alexander's 12/14 linkwrap at Slate Star Codex; it's got:

  • Werewolves (and the President of Argentina)
  • Nuclear rocket engines
  • Gender bias in maritime disasters ("Women and children first!" a myth?)
  • A new cure for Alzheimers
  • ...and so much more.

Do it!

1

Okay, okay, real links from me. The Economist explains why so many Koreans are named 'Kim'.

Kim:21.6%, Lee:14.8%, Park:8.5%, Choi:4.7%, Jung:4.4%
via Wikipedia, prevalence of the names Kim, Lee, Park, Choi, and Jung (combined with common similar-spellings)

It's got a lot to do with the country's feudal history (there was a time when surnames

READ MORE
1 / 1